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Liberia’s request for Nigerian teachers under the Technical Assistance Corps agreement has been met with condemnation of the Nigerian authorities by education unions, arguing that Nigeria itself is struggling to deliver quality education.

Nigerian education unions have highlighted their country’s shortage of teachers and struggle to ensure quality education. The reaction was prompted by a

On 9 March 2016, the European Commission published a new study regarding the diversity of the teaching profession in Europe, with a specific focus on teachers with a migrant and/or a minority background.

Concerning the diversity of the teaching workforce, there is a lack of data concerning the migrant or minority background in the different Member States of the European Union. Data is missing

The initiative ‘Science4Refugees’ matches refugees and asylum seekers who have a scientific background with positions in universities and research institutions that are 'refugee-welcoming organisations' and that have suitable positions available.

Science4Refugees is accessible to refugees and institutions through the EURAXESS - Researchers in Motion portal, a pan-European initiative providing access to

To prepare for the High-Level Meeting on refugees and migrants in New York in September, Education International joined global unions and civil society at the UN to defend children and educators.

On 18 July, the United Nations (UN) set the stage for the September meeting with Informal Hearings convened by the President of the UN General Assembly.

The Hearings were convened to consult  civil

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) staff discussion paper that was presented by C. Lagarde at the World Economic Forum called for ‘temporary and limited derogations of the minimum wage for refugees’ – a proposal that has met strong rejection by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) and other global union federations such as EI. 

The 50-page report, which “focuses on the economic

A Los Angeles teacher placement company has been ordered to pay $4.5 million to 350 Filipino teachers it lured to the United States and forced into exploitive contracts after arriving to teach in Louisiana. 

The verdict follows a two-week trial in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California in Los Angeles. The case was filed on behalf of the teachers by the Southern Poverty Law